# Sunday, 13 December 2009
Update Jan 2012: This article is way out of date. I've since moved to a MacPro for development, using VMWare Fusion to run some Windows apps.

What would be your ultimate machine for developing applications in the cloud?

I've been mulling over this question for a few weeks and finally got around to putting a solution together over a weekend. There are both hardware and software components:

Hardware
  • Something in between a netbook and laptop, around 4 pounds.
  • 8+ hour battery life
  • 1" thin (Easy to tote)
  • SSD (Solid State Disk 256 GB+)
  • 4 GB RAM
  • 2 GHz CPU+
  • ~$700
I settled on a new Acer 4810 Timeline which met most of my requirements. The exceptions being the Acer has a 1.3 GHz CPU and doesn't have SSD. I wanted the SSD primarily for a speedy boot time, but some tuning of the Win7 sleep options along with the Acer's 8+ hour battery life means the laptop is rarely ever turned off and can quickly recover from sleep mode.

Software

Next up was the software required to fully embrace the cloud. My list of essential cloud tools is no where near as prolific as Scott Hanselman's tool list. But hey, this is a nascent craft and we're just getting started. These tools are essential, in my opinion, for doing development on the leading cloud platforms.

Windows 7
Whoa! I can already hear my Mac toting friends clicking away from this blog post. "WTF? Why Windows 7 for a cloud development machine?" Well, there are several reasons:
  • First of all, even if you do develop on a Mac you likely have a Windows VM or dual boot configured for Windows anyway.
  • Windows has been running on x86 architecture for years. Mac only made the jump a few years ago and is still playing catch up on peripheral device and driver support.
  • Even Google, a huge cloud player, consistently will develop, test, and release all versions of Chrome and Google App Engine tools on Windows before any other platform. Windows developers typically get access to these tools months in advance of Mac users.
  • Eclipse is another tool that is well supported on Windows, above all other platforms.
  • Silverlight support. This is my RIA environment of choice going forward.

Visual Studio 2010 Beta 2
By the time you read this blog, perhaps this version of Visual Studio will be outdated, but it is the first release of VS designed with complete support for Azure.

Windows Azure
You'll need an Azure account to upload your application to the cloud for hosting.

Azure SDK
Great article here for getting started on installing/configuring your machine for the latest Azure bits

Azure Storage Explorer
Azure Storage Explorer is a useful GUI tool for inspecting and altering the data in your Azure cloud storage projects including the logs of your cloud-hosted applications.

Eclipse 
Eclipse is a Java-based IDE that requires the Java runtime

Rather than downloading the latest and greatest version of Eclipse, I recommend downloading whatever version is currently supported by the next essential cloud development tool (below)...

Force IDE
Eclipse Plug-in that supports development and management of Apex/Visualforce code on Salesforce.com's platform (aka Force.com)

Google App Engine
Currently, there are both Python and Java development environments for GAE. Like Azure, GAE supports development and debugging on localhost before uploading to the cloud, so the installation package provides a nice local cloud emulation environment.

SVN
I have a need for both the Windows Explorer Tortoise shell plug-in and the Eclipse plug-in. You may need only one or the other. All the Force.com open source projects are accessible via SVN.

Git on Windows (msysgit)
It seems gitHub is becoming the defacto standard for managing the source code for many web frameworks and projects. Excellent article here on how to install and configure Git on Windows

Amazon Web Services (AWS) Elastic Fox
Nice Firefox plug-in for managing EC2 and S3 instances on AWS. I mostly just use it for setting up temporary RDP whitelist rules on EC2 instances as I connect remotely from untrusted IP addresses (like airports/hotels/conferences).

I highly recommend using the browser based AWS console for all other provisioning and instance management. There's also an AWS management app for Android users called decaf.

Browsers
If you're doing real world web development, then you already know the drill. Download and install Internet Explorer 8, Firefox, and Chrome at minimum. In addition to the Elastic Fox plug-in (above) you'll want to install Firebug. IE 8 now has Firebug-like functionality built-in, called the Developer Toolbar. Just hit F12 to access it (see comparison with Firebug here).

I personally use JQuery for all web development that requires DOM manipulation to handle cross-browser incompatibilities and anomalies.

There are 6-10 other utilities and tools I installed on this machine that aren't specific to the cloud. Installing everything on this list took about 90 minutes (plus a couple hours to pull down all my SVN project folders for Passage and other related projects I manage).

Given that cloud development is all about distributing resources over servers and clients, I like to take a minimalist approach and reduce the surface area and drag of my local environment as much as possible. This improves OS and IDE boot time as well as eliminates a lot of common debugging issues as a result of version incompatibilities.

What about you? What hardware/tools/applications are essential to your cloud development projects?

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